Arizona Republic upholds court filing, demanding election audit records and public’s right to know

State Senate officials have refuted the public’s right to know, and the news agency wants all relevant documents unearthed.

The Republic of Arizona has filed a lawsuit in Maricopa Superior Court, seeking disclosure of all records — including internal communications and emails — of partisan Arizona State Senate members leading the 2020 Election Audit with taxpayer-funded prime contractor Cyber ​​Ninjas.

The state’s oldest news organization, established more than 130 years ago, has repeatedly requested documents from the partisan audit of Senate elections through Public Records Requests that have been repeatedly denied .

On Wednesday, the Republic filed a special action in Superior Court. Now the news agency is trying to access all financial and communications records surrounding the audit, both from the Senate and from the private contractor the agency hired to do the job.

“The Republican Senate audit debacle is made up of members who refuse to accept election results, even though our state’s election was verified as valid months ago. ”

The documents, according to the Arizona Republic, are public records and of great public interest “because the audit is conducted under the direction of the Senate, a public bodyand the Senate is required to make available records that are in the custody or control of the Cyber ​​Ninjas.

The Florida-based entrepreneur has many personal voting records from the public. Cyber ​​Ninjas CEO Doug Logan is a strong supporter of former President Donald Trump.

“All the financial records, how the audit is conducted, how much is paid to the Cyber ​​Ninjas, even the communication exchanges between these partisan officials of what, in particular, is not known to the public,” said one. former state official. Northeast Valley News Saturday on condition of anonymity. “The Republican Senate audit debacle is made up of members who refuse to accept election results, even though our state’s election was verified as valid months ago.

“This audit was conducted in secret and works primarily with information that belongs to the public.”

Arizona Republic editor Greg Burton explained why it was time for the paper to spring into action, nearly seven months after the 2020 election ended.

“The news agency is acting because the audit is being led by a group of Senate supporters who were on the ballots themselves,” Burton said. “Despite promises from Senate leaders that its vote auditing would be transparent, the recount operations were conducted largely in secret by committed outside parties serving as elected leaders.”